Our garden | The Slingshot Community Forum

Our garden

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jay, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    With the SHTF thread running, I thought I would share a few pictures of our garden, it has taken us three years to convert the rock hard clay soil in to something that provides us with all our fruit and vegetables, still a long way to go. All trees outside of fence are ours, mainly fruit and walnut trees, fence put inside perimeter to keep our dogs in and the wildlife out, there are many jackals here and they are as bold as anything.

    DSCN0038.JPG DSCN0039.JPG DSCN0040.JPG DSCN0041.JPG DSCN0042.JPG DSCN0043.JPG DSCN0044.JPG

    Sourced some wood today so next step is a small chicken run to be built (weather permitting) over next few days, currently checking out to see how to build one.

    Considering we had never grown anything before coming here we are learning slowly, thanks to Mr Google, wonderful thing this internet!

    Just hope this loads up okay!
     
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  2. st.clair county

    st.clair county Veteran Member

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    That's a nice looking garden. Lots of planning and hard work went into that.
     
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  3. Northwoods Hunting

    Northwoods Hunting Member

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    Nice garden! My problem animal is rabbits.:banghead:
     
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  4. AZ Stinger

    AZ Stinger Veteran Member

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    Ready for some production there with that set up....good luck
     
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  5. GunGuy

    GunGuy Active Member

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    Very nice garden, not many people can say jackals are a concern.

    Sent from my LG-LS980 using Tapatalk
     
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  6. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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    Great looking garden. What do you grow and how do you preserve it? I use both a pressure and water bath canner and also do fermented vegetables, kraut and pickled corn are 2 of my favorites.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
     
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  7. BarkyBow

    BarkyBow Veteran Member

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    Looks like heaven to me.
    A lot of hard work and hopefully a lot of reward.
    Good luck to you Jay:tu:
     
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  8. mort

    mort Member

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    reap what you sow :) great lookin garden.....oh yeah I see the catchbox infront'a ya firewood stack :tu:dont forget you'l need gun turrets in each corner of the patch if the SHTF
     
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  9. st.clair county

    st.clair county Veteran Member

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    Have you given any thought to raising rabbits?
     
  10. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    We are tackling chickens first once I have built a run and found out how to look after them, if we manage okay with them we have discussed attempting to keep rabbits (for food), a couple of goats (for milk, cheese and food) and maybe rear a lamb but it is all in the future as we are learning as we go along and making plenty of mistakes!
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2016
  11. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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  12. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    We grow a variety of things and have expanded on them every year, some of last years list and what we do with them:

    Potatoes – stored in the barn though the first year we stored them we lost most due to having them at ground level not thinking head as to how a prolonged spell off temperatures under –20 degrees would affect them, like I said we are novices at this!
    Carrots/Cabbages/Cauliflowers/Peas/Beans/Brusselsprouts – Blanched and frozen.
    Peppers (various types) – Frozen also dried and crushed.
    Tomatoes (various types) – Preserved in jars, some we flavour with garlic, mint or basil.
    Cucumbers/Lettuce/Radish - picked and eaten
    Beetroot – Pickled
    Onions/Leeks and Garlic – Dried, plaited and hung, onions and leeks also frozen.
    Aubergines/Courgettes – Courgettes frozen (we use them in bread).
    Sweet corn – Eaten and used as a screening plant, this year we will save for the chickens feed.
    Melons – Wine and eaten.
    Raspberries/Blackberries/Gooseberries/Strawberries/Wild Cherries/Plums/Drenki – Frozen and turned in to jams and compotes.
    Grapes – Home made wine, we “rescued” the vines in the garden and have planted some extra eating vines that should (hopefully) produce fruit this year. Last year we harvested 100 kilos of grapes and I am sitting here enjoying the product from them as I type this!!
    Herbs – Parsley, Thyme, Savoury, Rosemary, Lemon balm, Lemon grass, Mint, Basil (lemon, red and green), we have dug out an area just for herbs this year so will be attempting to grow different ones, besides drying them for use in the winter we use them to keep the insects away from us and the vegetables, mosquitoes can be a serious problem out here.

    We aim to get a water bath this year so most of the jars can be done over an open fire outside we have seen other villagers doing this so we will follow their lead.................

    Sorry for the long post.
     
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  13. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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    Dig a hole and line with straw, put your potatoes inside cover with more straw and dirt. When you finish it will look like a mound. It will protect them from freezing and when you want potatoes you can just go and dig a few up. Works for other root vegetables as well.

    A waterbath canner is really nothing more than a big pot that you can fully submerge your jars in. Works great for tomatoes, pickles or other high acid food. The Ball canning book can be bought through amazon and is an amazing resource. Me and my wife pick wild blackberries and make jelly when we have good producing years, it is my favorite. :D

    I don't mind the long posts at all, as my garden progress' I will be doing more myself.
     
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  14. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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    It is surprising what you can find to use that is not exactly meant for that purpose, like a large stockpot for waterbath. These 2 large jars we found at walmart labeled as candy jars for $10. They are perfect for making fermented pickles and kraut.
    jars.jpg
     
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  15. oldmiser

    oldmiser Veteran Member

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    I do a lot of pressure canning ...I buy meats pork ..beef..chicken ..bacon..Make meat balls.. on sale & can those
    also frozen vegatables when on sale for 1 dollar a bag..can those as well.Plus I even can butter..No refrigation needed.I am a apartment deweller in cement city..no place for a garden...Thanks for sharing guys...OM
     
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  16. JoSlo

    JoSlo Veteran Member

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    OM canned butter! Tell me more?
     
  17. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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  18. DarrinGlennCook

    DarrinGlennCook Veteran Member

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    Awesomeness.....
     
  19. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Each year we have been here so far has been different but as a rough guide we get all four seasons which we gauge by the wildlife around us.

    Winter – November to February, temperatures often drop to below – 20 degrees over night and at times rarely gets above freezing but then again we have sat outside on Boxing Day in T-shirts having dinner!

    Snow when it arrives is heavy, often 2-3 foot deep and up to twice that in the drifts but it is warmer when the snow is here than when it is clear with hard frosts. You see no-one and the only birds you regularly see are the Great Tits, Robins, Jays and Thrushes that feed on the food we put out. We do have fun trying to identify and follow animal tracks at this time of year.

    Spring – February to May, we still have days when the temperature never gets above freezing and have had snow as late as April but normally the sun is out and beginning to warm things up, this year we seem to be averaging @ 12 degrees. Often we get some heavy rains and strong winds with some really intense thunderstorms. Spring is marked by the return of the storks and starlings, woodpeckers calling from every direction, jays screaming and beautiful black ravens gliding over the tree tops. Buzzards, hawks and eagles begin to reappear in the forests and cuckoos can be heard and seen in the garden as well not forgetting the frogs and toads that start driving our dogs crazy in the garden, they love chasing them!

    Summer – June to September, the heat kicks in, at its height it can reach up to 45 degrees but at a guess it averages out to around the mid to late 30’s. We know summer is close as the jays head to the forest to be replaced by golden orioles, bee eaters, swallows, martins and hoopoes (though we have already seen our first one this year). We get very limited rainfall but we have a well in the garden that taps in to an underground spring, it can dry up once everyone starts drawing water from the spring elsewhere but it helps us out a lot.

    Autumn – October to November, it can be lovely warm and sunny or just warm and wet! The morning frosts start and snow fall is not unknown. Marked by all the birds migrating, the storks and starlings are particularly impressive.

    I hope the above explains things, our second year here though was a bad year, flooding everywhere, we had six solid weeks of mist and fog when we could not even see our back fence, we had to knock the ice of our coats when we returned from walking the dogs. We lived in a mud bath and not a week went by without more rain, it was constant and we were close to giving up, we are still repairing the damage it did to the house.

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  20. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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    BURRRR, sounds like a really short growing season. I am lucky here to have a long growing season but unlucky that there are not very many fruit trees that do well here.
     

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