Hunting with stones - uk law | The Slingshot Community Forum

Hunting with stones - uk law

Discussion in 'Slingshot Hunting' started by Mr-S, Jun 23, 2015.

  1. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    Hey guys, just found an interesting piece of info for all us UK members that use our slingshots to hunt small game. Some of you may know it, but I didn't so thought id share this:

    If you take a shot at a wood pigeon, rabbit, squirrel etc etc, kill it, walk over and pick it up, turn around and there is a nosey dog walker on the phone to the police - you may think "so what, im on common land and out in the open and its legal to hunt small game" and your right.... However if you use stones as ammo you are breaking the "wild mammals protection act 1996" and can (however unlikely) be fined or prosecuted.

    So make sure you stick to proper lead/steel ammo and use bands with sufficient power always. Then your safe and covered no matter what.

    Thanks guys


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  2. SharpshooterII

    SharpshooterII Active Member

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    Nice little bit of info !
     
  3. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    Yeh I was surprised to read it. But the law forbids stoning of animals (I think that's based on chavs lobbing rocks at ducks etc) however if we load our slingshots with rocks we are committing the same crime.


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  4. Clever Moniker

    Clever Moniker Administrator Staff Member Admin

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    Very interesting. I thought that most catapult hunting that occurred in the UK was poaching anyways though?? Also, doesn't poaching with a catapult have a long and deep history in the UK?
     
  5. wll

    wll Veteran Member

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    Very interesting, at least you are able to hunt small game with a slingshot.
    I'm surprised where I live in California they don't finger print you, have you wait 10 days while they do a $50 background check at your expense, for possession of a "Y" shaped branch that grew in your yard !

    wll
     
  6. Clever Moniker

    Clever Moniker Administrator Staff Member Admin

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    Have fun telling me I couldn't hunt. I think a law preventing people from hunting would be unethical.
     
  7. BillyBob

    BillyBob Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't stop the UK government...grrr
     
  8. BillyBob

    BillyBob Well-Known Member

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    @Mr-S Thanks for the info mate. Good job I only shoot with steel isn't it!!
     
  9. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    Well the law is very clear that your allowed to hunt in-season game on common land or private land (with landowners permission) however thats where it gets tricky because public footpaths cross through private land etc etc etc...

    However most "small game" are considered pests here in the UK anyway (wood pigeon, rabbits, grey squirrel etc etc) so I really don't think anyone gives a shit if you shoot um... Saves the farmer a pocket full of shells and afew hours each week.

    Ive had many a farmer drive past me and say hello while im "poaching pigeons" out the trees etc. I think as long as your upfront with them and say hello etc and not hiding from them and being sneaky they don't care in the slightest. If anything they appreciate it from my experience.

    @Clever Moniker yes hundreds of years ago everyone hunted. Bow hunting was part of daily life. But then a greedy king banned all bow hunting and decreed that all animals were now his and if you wanted meat you had to pay him. From then "poaching" became the new daily life lol. Dont know how I know that but there you go :)


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  10. SharpshooterII

    SharpshooterII Active Member

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    In the UK their are many issues around the word POACHING, imo poaching is going onto land that you do not have permission to be on to take game whether its with a sling, gun or dogs. But in the UK it means a lot more than that because of all the history behind it.
     
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  11. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    It means just that buddy.... I think the word gets thrown around abit. But here it means the same - hunting on someone else's land without permission. It only becomes more tricky because our "common land" usually has footpaths that lead through farmland etc... Where do you stand if your walking along a public footpath - thats run through a farmers field - and u shoot a rabbit thats 10meters infront of you??? But on the whole - nobody really cares. And u are usually the only person around for miles.


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  12. Alan

    Alan Veteran Member

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    Just don't smash in Mr Fluffy's head in front of some people out walking with there kids.
    I used to find most farmers would let you take rabbits on there land as long as you asked first.
    Keep it low key and nobody really cares.
     
  13. Alan

    Alan Veteran Member

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    I heard that poaching with a catapult became popular when the use of Bow's and Crossbows was banned due to concerns about animal welfare.
    The cynical side of me thinks it was just weathy land owners not wanting people using 'silent' weapons to take there stocks of game.
    Could be a load of rubbish, I don't know.
     
  14. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    Bows where banned by the last king. In an effort to raise taxes.

    But yes, famers are usually good folk and don't care what you take along the way on the footpaths. They are pests to farmers mostly anyway and it saves them disposing of them. Just be nice and polite. Say hi when you see them etc. And Ann will be good


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  15. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    Thats my experience with farmers anyway. All are really nice guys around us. And yes... Deffinatley wait untill the family of 5 have walked patch away before you take the shot haha


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  16. Alan

    Alan Veteran Member

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    I'm sure your right about the banning of Bows at sometime in our history.
    I read this in a thread on another forum, again I'v no idea if it's fact or fantasy...

    "The original legislation that outlawed bowhunting was in 1963. Permitted killing methods were listed, and archery equipment was not in the list. So bowhunting was outlawed by implication.

    The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 pulled this together with various other bits of legislation, and explicitly outlawed the use of archery equipment.

    The bit to look at is section 11:

    http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk/content...filesize=30831

    The legislation says that no bow or crossbow may be used, but doesn't actually say no arrow may be used! So you could argue in court that it only outlaws conking the animals on the head with a bow, not shooting them. [​IMG]"
     
  17. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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    Interesting information @Mr-S laws are a funny thing and leave a lot open for interpretation. I actually think the majority are ambiguous for a reason.
     
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  18. Alan

    Alan Veteran Member

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    I think you have to be cynical when it comes to interpreting these types of laws.
    Did they ban most guns in the uk because they were worried about us shooting each other, or us shooting them.
    I think the latter myself.
    Disarm and dumb down the plebs.
     
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  19. August West

    August West Veteran Member

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    You can read my signature to see where I stand. ;)
     
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  20. Mr-S

    Mr-S Veteran Member

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    I think your right Alan... The 2nd amendment in the US was put in place so that the public had the right to bare arms, form a militia and raise against the government if it ever became tyrannical.

    I suppose here in the UK they didn't want us to have the same right haha
     

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